Adactio: Journal—Instantiation

There needs to be a cultural change in how we approach building for the web. Yes, some of the tools we choose are part of the problem, but the bigger problem is that performance still isn’t being recognised as the most important factor in how people feel about websites (and by extension, the web). This isn’t just a developer issue. It’s a design issue. It’s a UX issue. It’s a business issue. Performance is everybody’s collective responsibility.

Source: Adactio: Journal—Instantiation

Great article (as always) by Jeremy Keith about why the web is so slow and painful to use… hint, because we built it that way!

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human_time_diff « WordPress Codex

Determines the difference between two timestamps.The difference is returned in a human readable format such as “1 hour”, “5 mins”, “2 days”.

Source: Function Reference/human time diff « WordPress Codex

Used this little known, but nice gem today. It’s a core WordPress function that gives human relative time from any other datetime in “U” format. Like so:

1
human_time_diff( date("U", strtotime($twitter_data[$i]->created_at)) );
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Cyclomatic Complexity: Logic in CSS – CSS Wizardry – CSS, OOCSS, front-end architecture, performance and more, by Harry Roberts

I recently hit upon a way of thinking that made me realise that CSS does include logic, and the fact that it’s rarely viewed as such is probably also why we end up with such poor CSS at all.I found myself explaining compound selectors to a client as being made up of the subject—the thing we’re actually interested in—and its conditions.

Source: Cyclomatic Complexity: Logic in CSS – CSS Wizardry – CSS, OOCSS, front-end architecture, performance and more, by Harry Roberts

Great article discussing how CSS does in fact contain some login based on your selectors, don’t overcomplicate it. Use as much specificity as you need and no more. I also like the reference to the Inception Rule.

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Add Links to Twitter Mentions, Hashtags, and URLs with PHP

This gem helped me out today as I was working with the Twitter API to create a custom WordPress widget. I was about to do exactly this and was not looking forward to it, luckily I did a quick search and found this webtips post. Thanks!

If you’re using the Twitter v1.1 API to fetch a user’s statuses from their timeline, then you’ve likely come across the fact that user mentions, hashtags, and urls do not have links in the “text” node of the JSON response the API returns. There is no element to follow the link, and there are no links to follow to check out a mention or hashtag on Twitter site. This can easily be overcome using PHP and parsing some of the data in the JSON response and wrapping the entities in the desired elements.

Source: Add Links to Twitter Mentions, Hashtags, and URLs with PHP

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Online regex tester and debugger: JavaScript, Python, PHP, and PCRE

Stumbled on a great regex tool today.

An explanation of your regex will be automatically generated as you type. Detailed match information will be displayed here automatically.

via Online regex tester and debugger: JavaScript, Python, PHP, and PCRE.

regex101.com

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CSS Dig

A chrome extension for analyzing your CSS. Check your properties (and reuse – are they following DRY principles?) and your CSS selectors (and their specificity).

Analyze your CSS in a new way. Consolidate, refactor, and gawk at the 37 shades of blue your site somehow ended up with.

Take a look at all your CSS properties, their frequency and variations. Have too many shades of blue? Inconsistencies often means confusion for your developers and irregularities for your end users.

Are your selectors long? Using lots of IDs? Specificity wars are frustrating and piling on new CSS will only make the situation worse. Find potential problem areas and make a plan to fix.

via CSS Dig.

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How to use solid web principles to justify what you were going to do anyway | A List, A Fart

Imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery, but mockery must be the biggest sign of mainstream… And this is a good thing, alistapart.com, the de facto web publication for web professionals, now has a parody site: alistafart.com. Tongue in cheek, and sarcastic, but sadly, sometimes not very far from the truth…

In this era of the web, there are generations of designers and programmers who have gone before us. Web design is being taught formally in schools and universities, and we draw knowledge from centuries of art, industrial design, and typography. Like never before, there is a wealth of great web principles that we can use to justify doing whatever it is we already wanted to do.

via How to use solid web principles to justify what you were going to do anyway | A List, A Fart.

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Add Shortcode with Add Media Button

This code snippet really helped me today and since the post doesn’t have commenting enabled, I wanted to say thanks here! Working on building a WordPress plugin that generates shortcodes and wanted an interface for the user to create their own with a wizard of sorts, so using a media button, shortcode and thickbox all together wasn’t very documented anywhere that I could find until I came across this one and I was happy to be able to lift what I needed from this snipped and see my code working like a charm now. The plugin I’m working on is for the Greenhouse Recruiting site and pulls in a job board onto your site via their API. The shortcode wizard will be included in a release soon so you can see it in action.

add shortcode to a page or post without remembering the shortcode itself… choose the shortcode parameters and then have it automatically place itself in the editor

via Add Shortcode with Add Media Button.

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A Developer’s Guide to Contributing to WordPress Core

Here’s a great post from the team at delicious brains, the same team who brings us WP Migrate DB Pro for all our wordpress database migration needs (and do a bang up job I might add). They discuss all the in and out of working with trac and the ticketing system as well as setting up a development site for testing and running unit test, making (and submitting) code patches and using svn to manage it all. It’s an awesome post full of meaty details on how to start getting involved, since if you’re new to it all, it certainly is a lot to figure out on your own. Give it a read and dive in to work toward your own contributions!

basics for finding things to work on, how to handle the WordPress source code, how to submit your work and what you might expect to happen from there.

via A Developer’s Guide to Contributing to WordPress Core.

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WordCamp Presentation on WordPress.TV

custom post types wordcamp presentation evan mullinsMy presentation about Custom Post Types and Custom Fields from WordCamp Atlanta 2014 has been added to wordpress.tv. Here it is! Enjoy!

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  • Recent Posts

    Adactio: Journal—Instantiation

    There needs to be a cultural change in how we approach building for the web. Yes, some of the tools we choose are part of the problem, but the bigger problem is that performance still isn’t being recognised as the most important factor in how people feel about websites (and by extension, the web). This […]

    human_time_diff « WordPress Codex

    Determines the difference between two timestamps.The difference is returned in a human readable format such as “1 hour”, “5 mins”, “2 days”. Source: Function Reference/human time diff « WordPress Codex Used this little known, but nice gem today. It’s a core WordPress function that gives human relative time from any other datetime in “U” format. […]

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    Cyclomatic Complexity: Logic in CSS – CSS Wizardry – CSS, OOCSS, front-end architecture, performance and more, by Harry Roberts

    I recently hit upon a way of thinking that made me realise that CSS does include logic, and the fact that it’s rarely viewed as such is probably also why we end up with such poor CSS at all.I found myself explaining compound selectors to a client as being made up of the subject—the thing […]

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    Add Links to Twitter Mentions, Hashtags, and URLs with PHP

    This gem helped me out today as I was working with the Twitter API to create a custom WordPress widget. I was about to do exactly this and was not looking forward to it, luckily I did a quick search and found this webtips post. Thanks! If you’re using the Twitter v1.1 API to fetch […]

    regex101.com

    Online regex tester and debugger: JavaScript, Python, PHP, and PCRE

    Stumbled on a great regex tool today. An explanation of your regex will be automatically generated as you type. Detailed match information will be displayed here automatically. via Online regex tester and debugger: JavaScript, Python, PHP, and PCRE.

    CSS Dig

    A chrome extension for analyzing your CSS. Check your properties (and reuse – are they following DRY principles?) and your CSS selectors (and their specificity). Analyze your CSS in a new way. Consolidate, refactor, and gawk at the 37 shades of blue your site somehow ended up with. Take a look at all your CSS […]

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