WordCamp Presentation on WordPress.TV

custom post types wordcamp presentation evan mullinsMy presentation about Custom Post Types and Custom Fields from WordCamp Atlanta 2014 has been added to wordpress.tv. Here it is! Enjoy!

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Custom Post Types or Choose Your Own Adventure – WordCamp Atlanta 2014

I’ve been fortunate enough to be able to present at WordCamp Atlanta 2014. That makes the 3rd year in a row I’ve been able to contribute to WordCamp Atlanta!

WCATL-Speaker

Here are my slides. I’ll be posting a full blown post of my presentation as soon as I can get it all down. Plus I hear there will be a video posted to wordpress.tv at some point, so, watch for that.

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What screens want

Great read if you haven’t yet read it yet:
Frank Chimero : What screens want : http://frankchimero.com/what-screens-want/

web and interaction design are just as much children of filmmaking as they are of graphic design. Maybe even more so. After all, we both work on screens, and manage time, movement, and most importantly, change.

So what does all of this mean? I think the grain of screens has been there since the beginning. It’s not tied to an aesthetic. Screens don’t care what the horses look like. They just want them to move. They want the horses to change.

Designing for screens is managing that change. To put a finer head on it, the grain of screens is something I call flux—

and more

Movement, change, and animation are a lot more than ways to delight users: they are a functional method for design.

These examples are essentially animated wireframes, but extra detail isn’t needed. Designing how things change and move is enough for us to understand what they are and the relationships between them. You don’t need the heavy-handed metaphor, because the information is baked into the element’s behavior, not its aesthetics.

A designer’s work is not only about how the things look, but also their behaviors in response to interaction, and the adjustments they make between their fixed states. In fact, designing the way elements adapt and morph in the in-between moments is half of your work as a designer. You’re crafting the interstitials.

We’ve been more aware of this interstitial work in the past few years because of responsive design’s popularity and its resistance to fixed states. It’s a step in the right direction, but it has made work crazy frustrating.

Please read the full article: http://frankchimero.com/what-screens-want/

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Before You Report that Bug, Use this Pre-Contact, Self-Diagnosis Routine

Wisdom for bug reporting from Newfangled

There are a few things a developer usually needs to know in order to diagnose a bug, and these are the things we’re likely to come back and ask you about if you haven’t already provided them. So, to ensure we can help you as quickly as possible, here’s a pre-contact, self-diagnosis routine to help guide you in reporting a problem. 

1. Can the Issue Be Reproduced on Other Computers or Devices?

2. What environment are you encountering the bug in?

3. Did you clear your cache?

4. Call vs Email.

via Newfangled RSS FEED: http://bit.ly/1cJE1qO

The first step to being able to fix bugs is having the right information about what is causing them. I can’t say how many times I’ve been tasked with a bug that I can’t reproduce. It ends up taking longer to diagnose it than it does to fix it, or to rule it out as some issue that’s already been fixed and was just caused by cache… The world of bug reporters should read the article though to help exterminate the bugs…

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In dependence – Not dead

Great summary and call to arms to write our own content in our own ways on our own sites. Call it what you like but ‘blogging’ is somewhat waning, in the social webs. Since as easy it is to create your own site and express your own voice, we’re flocking to the ‘services’ that will then own our content along with all the restrictions around it. Facebook and twitter and everywhere else make it effortless to publish to the web, but at the cost of us losing our voice…

Jason Kottke wrote an end-of-the-year piece for the Nieman Journalism Lab called The blog is dead, long live the blog:

Sometime in the past few years, the blog died. In 2014, people will finally notice.

But the second part of the article’s title is as important as the first:

Over the past 16 years, the blog format has evolved, had social grafted onto it, and mutated into Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest and those new species have now taken over.

Jason’s piece prompted some soul-searching.

Frank is planting his flag in his own sand with his minifesto Homesteading 2014

I’m returning to a personal site, which flips everything on its head. Rather than teasing things apart into silos, I can fuse together different kinds of content.

So, I’m doubling down on my personal site in 2014.

He is not alone. Many of us are feeling an increasing unease, even disgust, with the sanitised, shrink-wrapped, handholding platforms that make it oh-so-easy to get your thoughts out there …on their terms …for their profit.

Of course independent publishing won’t be easy. Facebook, Pinterest, Medium, Twitter, and Tumblr are all quicker, easier, more seductive.

In all likelihood, the independent web will never be able to match the power and reach of the silos. But that won’t stop me (and others) from owning our own words. If nothing else, we can at least demonstrate that the independent path is an option—even if that option requires more effort.

I have a horrible feeling that many of the people publishing with the easy-to-use tools of today’s social networks don’t realise how fragile their repository is, not least because everyone keeps repeating the lie that “the internet never forgets.”

I hope that you too will be publishing on your own website in 2014.

via Adactio: Journal: http://adactio.com/journal/6620/

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I ain’t ‘fraida no maths

I’d heard of the ‘coding maths’ series, but hadn’t watched it yet. I should have, it’s great! Keith Peters (one of the people who first got me into scripting) has a great series about the math behind coding and as always he has a way of making complex things simple to me!

Learn all you need to know about maths for programming with this brilliant video series from Keith Peters. I always encourage people to learn to code and often they’ll reply that they’re “not good enough at maths”. The truth is … Continue reading

via CreativeJS: http://creativejs.com/2014/01/i-aint-fraida-no-maths/

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Codecademy & English Computing Curriculum

Today, Codecademy is really pleased to announce our partnership with Computing at School (CAS), the leading authority on the new computing curriculum in England. England is the first country to mandate programing in schools. Starting in September 2014, students aged between 5-16 will learn HTML, CSS, Python and JavaScript. CAS were largely responsible for designing the curriculum objectives, and are leading the way in teacher training.

Continue reading

via Dreaming in Flash: http://dreaminginflash.com/codecademy-english-computing-curriculum/

This is a very interesting trend (along with the hour of code recently) that is focused on educating the next generation of developers. Also pushing the idea that we will need more developers and programmers as we more farther into the information age and will need more people to manage the more systems of more data and computing. Seems those who are best educated will be ready to take it on while the rest watch the “magicians” work.

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Breakouts: Comparison of JavaScript Game Engines via Breakout

There are tons of javascript engines out there that are partial or full game engines for javascript and html.  Choosing one is quite difficult so Breakouts is there to help you compare with a common game ‘Breakout’ across all your favorites and some you might not know.

via *drawlogic: http://drawlogic.com/2013/12/03/breakouts-comparison-of-javascript-game-engines/

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WordPress presentations on WordPress.tv

I’ve made presentations at WordCamp Atlanta for the past two years. I’d been told the presentation was recorded and would be added to the repository of wordcamp presentations at wordpress.tv both times, long story short. They have both made it online now. Thanks to whoever posts them and Happy Birthday WP. Enjoy the presentations!

WordCamp Atlanta 2012
Evan Mullins: From PSD to WordPress Theme: Under the Skin
This presentation covers how to get from Photoshop to WordPress. There are many different roads to a theme. Covering a few possibilities and then cover getting from a design in Photoshop to an actual WordPress child theme while trying not to reinvent the wheel.
http://wordpress.tv/2013/05/24/evan-mullins-from-psd-to-wordpress-theme-under-the-skin/

 

WordCamp Atlanta 2013
Evan Mullins: Your Firstborn Child Theme- Child Themes 101+102
Learn how to mod themes the right way. Using child themes you won’t loose your edits when there’s a theme update.
http://wordpress.tv/2013/05/04/evan-mullins-your-firstborn-child-theme-child-themes-101102/

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In this ever-changing industry in which we work in

I’m constantly excited by the web design industry because as it is such a young field, we are still making up the rules and discovering as a community what processes are best. At the same time, the technology driving the field is changing so fast that just when we start to settle into a routine it all gets flipped on it’s head and we’re reconsidering everything again.

Have humans ever had to change up what they do as fast and often as we do? Our craft exists in a never-ending state of flux. It won’t settle down for a while, if ever.

&

Sometimes I dream about being able to master something without the ground constantly shifting under my feet. The status quo feels like a warm blanket sometimes; who wouldn’t want their world to act more or less predictably?

via The Pastry Box Project | 7 February 2013, Ben Sauer of Clear Left.

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