Add Links to Twitter Mentions, Hashtags, and URLs with PHP

This gem helped me out today as I was working with the Twitter API to create a custom WordPress widget. I was about to do exactly this and was not looking forward to it, luckily I did a quick search and found this webtips post. Thanks!

If you’re using the Twitter v1.1 API to fetch a user’s statuses from their timeline, then you’ve likely come across the fact that user mentions, hashtags, and urls do not have links in the “text” node of the JSON response the API returns. There is no element to follow the link, and there are no links to follow to check out a mention or hashtag on Twitter site. This can easily be overcome using PHP and parsing some of the data in the JSON response and wrapping the entities in the desired elements.

Source: Add Links to Twitter Mentions, Hashtags, and URLs with PHP

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Online regex tester and debugger: JavaScript, Python, PHP, and PCRE

Stumbled on a great regex tool today.

An explanation of your regex will be automatically generated as you type. Detailed match information will be displayed here automatically.

via Online regex tester and debugger: JavaScript, Python, PHP, and PCRE.

regex101.com

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CSS Dig

A chrome extension for analyzing your CSS. Check your properties (and reuse – are they following DRY principles?) and your CSS selectors (and their specificity).

Analyze your CSS in a new way. Consolidate, refactor, and gawk at the 37 shades of blue your site somehow ended up with.

Take a look at all your CSS properties, their frequency and variations. Have too many shades of blue? Inconsistencies often means confusion for your developers and irregularities for your end users.

Are your selectors long? Using lots of IDs? Specificity wars are frustrating and piling on new CSS will only make the situation worse. Find potential problem areas and make a plan to fix.

via CSS Dig.

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How to use solid web principles to justify what you were going to do anyway | A List, A Fart

Imitation may be the sincerest form of flattery, but mockery must be the biggest sign of mainstream… And this is a good thing, alistapart.com, the de facto web publication for web professionals, now has a parody site: alistafart.com. Tongue in cheek, and sarcastic, but sadly, sometimes not very far from the truth…

In this era of the web, there are generations of designers and programmers who have gone before us. Web design is being taught formally in schools and universities, and we draw knowledge from centuries of art, industrial design, and typography. Like never before, there is a wealth of great web principles that we can use to justify doing whatever it is we already wanted to do.

via How to use solid web principles to justify what you were going to do anyway | A List, A Fart.

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Add Shortcode with Add Media Button

This code snippet really helped me today and since the post doesn’t have commenting enabled, I wanted to say thanks here! Working on building a WordPress plugin that generates shortcodes and wanted an interface for the user to create their own with a wizard of sorts, so using a media button, shortcode and thickbox all together wasn’t very documented anywhere that I could find until I came across this one and I was happy to be able to lift what I needed from this snipped and see my code working like a charm now. The plugin I’m working on is for the Greenhouse Recruiting site and pulls in a job board onto your site via their API. The shortcode wizard will be included in a release soon so you can see it in action.

add shortcode to a page or post without remembering the shortcode itself… choose the shortcode parameters and then have it automatically place itself in the editor

via Add Shortcode with Add Media Button.

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A Developer’s Guide to Contributing to WordPress Core

Here’s a great post from the team at delicious brains, the same team who brings us WP Migrate DB Pro for all our wordpress database migration needs (and do a bang up job I might add). They discuss all the in and out of working with trac and the ticketing system as well as setting up a development site for testing and running unit test, making (and submitting) code patches and using svn to manage it all. It’s an awesome post full of meaty details on how to start getting involved, since if you’re new to it all, it certainly is a lot to figure out on your own. Give it a read and dive in to work toward your own contributions!

basics for finding things to work on, how to handle the WordPress source code, how to submit your work and what you might expect to happen from there.

via A Developer’s Guide to Contributing to WordPress Core.

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WordCamp Presentation on WordPress.TV

custom post types wordcamp presentation evan mullinsMy presentation about Custom Post Types and Custom Fields from WordCamp Atlanta 2014 has been added to wordpress.tv. Here it is! Enjoy!

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Custom Post Types or Choose Your Own Adventure – WordCamp Atlanta 2014

I’ve been fortunate enough to be able to present at WordCamp Atlanta 2014. That makes the 3rd year in a row I’ve been able to contribute to WordCamp Atlanta!

WCATL-Speaker

Here are my slides. I’ll be posting a full blown post of my presentation as soon as I can get it all down. Plus I hear there will be a video posted to wordpress.tv at some point, so, watch for that.

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What screens want

Great read if you haven’t yet read it yet:
Frank Chimero : What screens want : http://frankchimero.com/what-screens-want/

web and interaction design are just as much children of filmmaking as they are of graphic design. Maybe even more so. After all, we both work on screens, and manage time, movement, and most importantly, change.

So what does all of this mean? I think the grain of screens has been there since the beginning. It’s not tied to an aesthetic. Screens don’t care what the horses look like. They just want them to move. They want the horses to change.

Designing for screens is managing that change. To put a finer head on it, the grain of screens is something I call flux—

and more

Movement, change, and animation are a lot more than ways to delight users: they are a functional method for design.

These examples are essentially animated wireframes, but extra detail isn’t needed. Designing how things change and move is enough for us to understand what they are and the relationships between them. You don’t need the heavy-handed metaphor, because the information is baked into the element’s behavior, not its aesthetics.

A designer’s work is not only about how the things look, but also their behaviors in response to interaction, and the adjustments they make between their fixed states. In fact, designing the way elements adapt and morph in the in-between moments is half of your work as a designer. You’re crafting the interstitials.

We’ve been more aware of this interstitial work in the past few years because of responsive design’s popularity and its resistance to fixed states. It’s a step in the right direction, but it has made work crazy frustrating.

Please read the full article: http://frankchimero.com/what-screens-want/

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Before You Report that Bug, Use this Pre-Contact, Self-Diagnosis Routine

Wisdom for bug reporting from Newfangled

There are a few things a developer usually needs to know in order to diagnose a bug, and these are the things we’re likely to come back and ask you about if you haven’t already provided them. So, to ensure we can help you as quickly as possible, here’s a pre-contact, self-diagnosis routine to help guide you in reporting a problem. 

1. Can the Issue Be Reproduced on Other Computers or Devices?

2. What environment are you encountering the bug in?

3. Did you clear your cache?

4. Call vs Email.

via Newfangled RSS FEED: http://bit.ly/1cJE1qO

The first step to being able to fix bugs is having the right information about what is causing them. I can’t say how many times I’ve been tasked with a bug that I can’t reproduce. It ends up taking longer to diagnose it than it does to fix it, or to rule it out as some issue that’s already been fixed and was just caused by cache… The world of bug reporters should read the article though to help exterminate the bugs…

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